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What to look for when shopping
Most home security cameras perform the same basic functions—they detect an event, record the event, and send you an alert—but they don't all perform them the same way. And some cameras have special features that go beyond those basics. Here are some common features you'll encounter while shopping and why they're important

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How to choose a home security camera
Alerts: Home security cameras push notifications to your smartphone when they detect events. Without watching the live feed all day, this is the only way to keep tabs on your home in relative real time. Depending on the camera, it may send text alerts when it detects motion, sound, a face (known or unrecognized), or all three. Some can send alerts to multiple people, usually anyone else in the household using that product's app; others will send emails in addition to text messages as a failsafe in the event you can't access your mobile device.

Cloud recording: Many manufacturers offer cloud storage plans with their camera. With one of these, your recorded video is sent to a remote server and stored for a predetermined time— usually anywhere from 24 hours to a week—and then deleted to make space for new videos. Though sometimes free, these cloud plans usually require a monthly subscription, but are worth it both for their convenience and if you want a surveillance record during a vacation or other extended time away from home.

Environmental monitoring: This is the feature that sets all-in-one home monitors apart from strictly-security cameras. Though the home "vitals" that these units track vary by model—we've seen everything from motion to luminosity included in home health profiles—three tend to be ubiquitous:
Temperature monitors for spikes and dips in indoor temperature and alerts when it falls outside a range you define.

Air quality tracks pollutants ranging from cooking odors to carbon monoxide. However, most monitors don't identify the pollutant in their alerts, merely warning that the air quality is "abnormal." Because of that, this feature should not be considered a substitute for potentially life-saving devices like smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

Facial recognition: A few newer cameras are experimenting with facial recognition. This feature could more accurately be called "facial identification," as in practice it's much better at distinguishing a face from, say, a lamp, than it is at actually distinguishing between one person's face and another's. If you opt for a camera with this feature, know that it typically learns faces through increasing exposure to them, so be prepared to spend a lot of time in front of the lens.

Local storage: Some cameras include memory-card slots in lieu of, or in addition to, cloud storage, so you can store video right on the device. It's an attractive feature as it can eliminate the cost of monthly storage fees. The downside (if there isn't a cloud backup) is that if a crook steals your camera, he takes your forensic evidence with it.

Mobile app: Most of today's home security camera's are accessed primarily through a smartphone/tablet app. In addition to offering you a reliable way to view the camera's live feed, it should offer plenty of options for customizing the way the camera performs. The ability to customize notifications, adjust motion and sound detection sensitivity, and set detection areas are some of the key features to look for. The app should also be intuitive and easy to master.

Motion detection: Assuming you're monitoring your home when it's empty, motion detection is one of the most desirable features in a security camera. Built-in sensors pick up movement within the camera's field of view and trigger video recording.

Night vision: Most break-ins occur after dark, so this feature is nearly as important as motion detection. Technically, most home security cameras support infrared LED illumination, versus true night vision based on image intensification or thermal vision. Be that as it may, some camera's will switch to night vision automatically in low-light conditions, while others allow you to customize when and how it should be activated.

Scheduling: Scheduling features allow you to tell the camera to turn on and off, detect motion, and/or send alerts at specified times. This is useful when you, say, only want to be notified when your kids get home from school or just want to monitor your home when you're away. It also reduces the amount of false alerts.

Security: There have been plenty of headlines about hackers compromising home cameras, baby monitors, and other Wi-Fi devices to spy on people, so be sure to check what steps has each manufacturer taken to eliminate this problem. Look for a camera that supports up-to-date wireless security protocols, such as WPA2, and make sure it encrypts internet transmission of your user name, your password, and the live feeds. Never install a security camera (or a router or any other device on your home network) without changing its default user ID and password.

Viewing angle: The camera's field of view determines how much it can see. As you're probably monitoring a single room, you want a wide viewing angle. Most current cameras fall in the 130-degree range. These wide angles can sometimes cause image distortion at the edges in the form of a fisheye effect, particularly when used in smaller rooms, but it's not like you're going to use a security to capture snapshots for your photo album.

Web client: Many cameras can be accessed through a web portal as well. This is useful for times when you don't have access to your mobile device or a wireless connection. The web app should closely mirror its mobile counterpart, so you don't need to learn a whole new set of controls.

Wireless range: One of the benefits wireless cameras offer is the ability to move them around your home. Ideally, your home security camera should be able to maintain a Wi-Fi connection no matter how far you move it from your router, even in a large home. Some cameras come with an ethernet port as well, so you have the option of hardwiring it to your local network. A camera that supports power-over-ethernet (PoE) eliminates the need for an AC adapter and relies on just one cable


Features

  • detection of moving people or vehicles;
  • recognition of car license plates
  • detection of people in crowded environments,
  • unattended objects within restricted areas;
  • detection of objects by shapes;
  • detection of objects that disappear from the field of view (theft control).

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